Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (1985)

Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (1985)

Five years after killing the goalie hockey-masked killer Jason Voorhees, Tommy Jarvis has grown up in various mental hospitals unable to get over the nightmares about Jason’s return. When Tommy is sent to a rural halfway house in New Jersey for mentally disturbed teenagers, a series of grisly murders begin anew as another hockey-masked killer begins killing off all people at and around the residence. Has Jason returned from the dead to re-start his killing spree? Has Tommy decided to take over the reign of Jason, or has someone else?

Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (also known as Friday the 13th Part V: A New Beginning) is a 1985 American slasher film directed by Danny Steinmann and the fifth installment in the Friday the 13th film series. The film stars John Shepherd as Tommy Jarvis, the boy who killed Jason Voorhees in the previous installment, Friday the 13th: The Final Chapter (1984). Shepherd replaces Corey Feldman, who played Tommy in The Final Chapter, although Feldman makes a cameo appearance in the film’s prologue.

A New Beginning departs from the Camp Crystal Lake setting and Voorhees-themed mystery of the previous four installments and instead acts as a psychological horror film set at a fictional halfway house, where Tommy begins to fear again as a new series of brutal murders have been occurring by a new hockey-masked assailant.

Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (1985)

About the Story

Five years after the demise of mass murderer Jason Voorhees killed by the youngest survivor Tommy Jarvis, said person awakens from a nightmare of him witnessing two grave robbers digging up Jason Voorhees’s body in which Jason rises from the grave to murder the grave robbers before advancing towards Tommy. Upon being transferred to Pinehurst Halfway House, a secluded residential treatment facility, Tommy is led by the director Pam Roberts to head doctor Matt Letter.

In his assigned room, Tommy also meets Reggie, a boy whose grandfather George works as the kitchen cook. Other teens introduced are kind-hearted Robin, Goth Violet, shy Jake, short-tempered Vic, and compulsive eater Joey. The sheriff brings two more residents, nymphomaniac lovers Eddie and Tina, after catching them having sex on neighbor Ethel Hubbard’s lawn. Ethel Hubbard and her son Junior show up and threaten to have the house closed down if the teens do not stop sneaking onto their property.

Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (1985)

One day, in a fit of rage, Vic kills an irritating Joey with an double-bit axe and is subsequently arrested. Attending ambulance drivers Duke and Roy Burns discover the body; Roy is saddened by the death, but Duke believes that the murder was a harmless prank. That night, two nearby punks Vinnie and Pete are murdered by an unseen assailant after their car breaks down. The following night, Billy and his friend Lana are killed with an double-bit axe. Panic begins to ensue, but the mayor refuses the sheriff’s claim that somehow Jason Voorhees has returned.

The next day, more murders occur when Tina and Eddie sneak off into the woods. Ethel’s farmhand Raymond is killed while spying on the two having sex. While Eddie leaves to go wash off in the creek, Tina is murdered with a pair of garden shears and Eddie, upon returning to find her dead, is killed against a tree with a belt. Meanwhile, Tommy and Pam accompany Reggie to visit Reggie’s older brother Demon and his girlfriend Anita. While there, Junior has a fight with Tommy, and he runs off when Pam tries to stop it. After Reggie and Pam leave, Demon and Anita are murdered. At the Hubbard farm, Ethel and Junior are both killed as well with a meat cleaver.

Friday the 13th: A New Beginning Movie Poster (1985)

Friday the 13th: A New Beginning (1985)

Directed by: Danny Steinmann
Starring: Melanie Kinnaman, John Shepherd, Anthony Barrile, Suzanne Bateman, Dominick Brascia, Juliette Cummins, Tiffany Helm
Screenplay by: Martin Kitrosser, David Cohen
Production Design by: Robert Howland
Cinematography by: Stephen L. Posey
Film Editing by: Bruce Green
Music by: Harry Manfredini
Distributed by: Paramount Pictures
Release Date: March 22, 1985